All posts for the day March 1st, 2018

The bill, H.R. 1865, is euphemistically named the “Allow States and Victims to Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act” (FOSTA), despite the fact that there’s nothing stopping state authorities from punishing sex traffickers and their allies at present and despite the fact that trafficking victims can already sue abusers in civil court. FOSTA’s actual targets are adults consensually engaging in prostitution as well as web platforms that allow user-generated content.

H.R. 1865 creates the new offense of intentional promotion or facilitation of prostitution while using or operating a facility or means of interstate or foreign commerce, such as the internet. A general violation of this offense will be punishable by a sentence of upwards of 10 years.

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Ann Wagner (R-Missouri), has had bipartisan support in the House from the get-go, despite objections from a wide range of stakeholders, from victims’ advocacy organizations to the U.S. Department of Justice, which has already declared the bill “unconstitutional.”